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Lynn and Adele

Posted by on Apr 23, 2013 in Testimonials | 0 comments

Lynn and Adele

This is Adele… She had all kinds of trouble with breathing. Because she is so small I thought she got plenty of exercise running around in the house and backyard. When I heard about Weight Waggers, I started thinking about how much we think about exercise and not so much about regular movement. I started Adele on a regular walking program and I also made some changes in her diet based on the Weight waggers suggestions. I really did these things to help Adele but her improvement was so dramatic, she really started thriving. I then realized how much the walks were helping me too. I spend a lot of time at my desk and I try to get my exercise in at the gym. But sometimes weeks go by and I just can’t seem to find the time to squeeze it in. Now that Adele and I have a dedicated walking time I’ve really changed my habits. What used to be a chose or a task on my to-do list is now something I really look forward too.. If nothing else, it is the only time I separate myself from my cell phone. I made the picture to give a thumbs up for Weight Waggers… it really is dogs and people getting healthy...

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Leigh

Posted by on Apr 23, 2013 in Testimonials | 0 comments

Leigh

diMy wonderful husband turned the big 50 in September 2011. On a recent visit to his doctor, he was diagnosed with high cholesterol, diabetes, and told to lose weight. They referred him to a dietician who asked if he knew what a low fat diet was. He was told that he needed to lose at least fifty pounds. For a man like him, who has always been physically active and thin most of his life, this came as a shock! He knew that he had a little belly but had no idea how his health had escalated out of control by eating high calorie snacks and fast foods. Reaching middle age and fearing heart disease he knew that he had to make some drastic changes to get his health back in check. He tried different diet programs but found most of them to be too restrictive. A friend of ours suggested walking our dogs every day for at least 45 minutes. Last year, one of our dogs had to have double ACL surgery done in both of her back legs. It was very expensive and her recovery has been a long, slow process. He decided to take her and our overweight redbone coonhound Weight Wagging. It was one of the best decisions he’s ever made! Since he started Weight Wagging, he has lost thirty pounds and our redbone has lost five pounds! My husband no longer needs medicine for diabetes and his cholesterol levels have come down so much that he went off Simvastatin. Thanks to his Weight Wagging routine, our family is much healthier and happier! Blessings,...

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Janna and Fox

Posted by on Apr 23, 2013 in Testimonials | 0 comments

Janna and Fox

I became a regular dog walker almost three years ago, after adopting Fox and Charlie, our two beautiful foxhounds. They were shelter dogs, each with a unique set of quirks and challenges. Initially, I viewed dog walking as another daily responsibility, something to keep my dogs healthy and psychologically balanced. As a full-time personal trainer, people assume that I’m constantly moving – but a lot of my job actually involves standing in one spot, watching someone else exercise. I figured, “I’ll get a little more exercise myself, and the dogs will get what they need.” In a short period of time, these walks came to mean so much more to me. Our walks are a time of meditation for me. They are not the equivalent of walking by myself. Somehow, the presence and energy of these animals serves as a point of connection – to the wind and to the ground beneath my feet — to my senses in general. It connects me with the natural world through my dogs’ extrasensory awareness of it, and their inability to do anything but live exactly in the present moment. I feel their movement through the leashes and innately respond to it, and it often seems that we find some kind of inexplicable symmetry. I gain measurable relief from my stress in this time spent moving and being with my dogs, and this benefit carries over to my clients. I tell people that they can’t release their extra weight – in order to use it – until they address their stress. Walking my dogs gives so much more than the calorie burn of walking – it gives me experiences and benefits that nothing else can quite...

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Simple guidelines for developing Walking Habits

Posted by on Apr 22, 2013 in Walking | 0 comments

Simple guidelines for developing Walking Habits

So, if walking is such an amazing activity, how should you do it? Seems like a weird question right? I mean walking is walking, how complicated can it get? Although this is true, how you should walk still remains a very important question, simply because many people have lots of misconceptions when it comes to this wonderful activity. Here are our simple guidelines to get you started with making “walking a habit”: Try and walk a bit everyday, because HOW OFTEN is a lot more important than HOW you walk. The only way to make a new habit it to keep practicing it. This sounds daunting at first. Doing anything everyday almost seems impossible. But there are some things that you probably do, every single day. Brushing your teeth is a simple example. You don’t need to brush your teeth. It’s not something that you “have” to do. Yet you still do it because you know it’s good for you. And by now, it’s likely that brushing your teeth is just something that you do everyday, without thinking about it much.The reason you brush your teeth everyday without thinking much about it is because you have made it a habit. “Habits” are created in our brains through a process called Neuro Plasticity. Basically, when you do something over and over again for a period of time, your brain changes so that it becomes easier to do that thing again in the future. This is what learning really is, and this same principle can be used to help you get in the habit of walking everyday. Get used to planning, because ritual makes habitual. Giving yourself an allocated time to walk everyday is crucial for your success. Let’s go back to the example of brushing your teeth. In all likelihood, you probably do this at the same time everyday, say after breakfast and before bed. It’s this consistency that creates the habit. Doing the same thing at the same time trains your brain to expect that again in the future.Maybe you like the idea of a daily walk but don’t believe you have enough time. You have the same amount of time as every other person – 24 hours a day. You cannot make time but you can manage it. And if you don’t manage to find time for health, you will eventually be forced to find time for illness. Remember those wise words – failure to plan is planning to fail.Establishing the habit is what involves effort – by definition the habit itself is basically effortless. Start thinking of yourself as “an active person.” Daily walking is about avoiding the pitfalls of the sedentary lifestyle. Walking gets you back in the habit of moving again. How can you expect to exercise 3-4 times a week if you can’t even get yourself to walk on those days? Walking is fantastic because it gives you that shift in momentum. After a few months, or even a few weeks, you will begin to hopefully notice a shift in your attitude towards moving your body. Walking reminds you that moving is not something that you “should” or “need” to do but rather something that you want and like to do.Humans are designed to move. In essence, that’s what we do. If you have lost your love for movement,...

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Dog walking: A life-long fitness partnership

Posted by on Apr 20, 2013 in Motivation | 0 comments

Dog walking: A life-long fitness partnership

Expanding waistlines are a real challenge for our society. Not only can our weight make us feel bad  about ourselves, but it gives rise to a host of other health issues, like heart disease, diabetes and stroke. If the trend of rising obesity continues, it has been estimated that, by the start of the next decade, 75% of adult Americans will be overweight. The good news is that there is a remarkably easy way to lose weight; most of us know it, we just don’t  get around to doing it. There’s no secret to it, it doesn’t cost money and it’s simple: eat healthy food and take some moderate exercise. The trouble is that many of us can’t motivate ourselves to follow this simple advice. Modern life is fast paced and many of us don’t have the energy to prepare good food and get outside for some fresh air. Exhausted at the end of another busy day, we grab some over-processed fast food, and wile away our free time in front of a screen. Some of us have an unwitting partner in crime: our dog. America’s dogs are suffering an obesity epidemic too. The American Veterinary Medical Association estimates that over 50% of the nation’s dogs are obese. Why? Well, we feed them over-processed cheap kibble, and then, because we are tired, we short-change them on their walks. Many of us have large yards and it’s an easy assumption to make that the dog is managing to get enough exercise out there on its own. Or, feeling guilty, we compensate by over-feeding them. Worse, some dogs find themselves handed over to shelters when their boredom spills out into unwanted behavior. It can happen all too easily but thankfully there is a solution. Weight Waggers are here to get you and your dog off the couch and out the front door together. Dog walking shouldn’t be yet another chore in your jam‐packed life. We are going to show you that it can be an enjoyable, energizing activity that sparks vitality and sets both you and your dog up for life-long health. It will become a habit, but one that you can actually enjoy! You’re never going to find a more motivated and enthusiastic training buddy than your dog. Studies show that people who start walking for health are far more likely to stick to their new activity if they have a dog for a companion,  than those who walk alone, or even those who choose a human buddy. All the two of you have to do is step out together for a walk every day, and soon you will both be reaping the health rewards. It really is that...

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Do it for the dog, do it for you

Posted by on Apr 20, 2013 in Motivation | 0 comments

Do it for the dog, do it for you

People start to walk for all sorts of reasons. They know that it’s healthy and they need to stay active. Unfortunately, no matter how hard we work, our effort and energy are measured by our motivation. When we’re doing things for ourselves, to be healthy and fit, we can easily slide. But when we’re asked to perform for someone else, when the motivation is external, we rise to the occasion. We even go above and beyond. When you’re deciding to walk your dog, don’t think about it as something you’re only doing for yourself or only for your four-legged friend. The relationship helps both of you. Here’s a startling statistic: more than 50% of dogs are overweight. Like people, they’re overfed and under-exercised. When you take a dog out on a walk, you’re participating to the of their natural instincts to explore. It stimulates their brains and keeps them happy. Walks keep the dog calm and help them bond with you as well. Rather than simply letting your furry friend out into the yard, take a stroll together through the neighborhood. You’ll get benefit from the physical activity, true, but you’ll also have the knowledge that you’re doing a good thing for your pet. The happiness of your pet is a great reason to get moving. But remember, when you walk your dog, you’re not only helping THEM stay active and fit, you’re also doing the same for YOURSELF! You get the same benefits your dog gets from walking. Regular walks will reduce stress and inflammation, burn calories and lower cholesterol levels. Walking helps maintain weight loss over the long term and reduces the risk of diabetes by a third. All that just from walking and spending time outside with a perfect support system. The dog is always going to help you stay fit as long as they get to have some of the...

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Motivational dogs

Posted by on Apr 20, 2013 in Motivation | 0 comments

Motivational dogs

It’s easier to start a fitness regime with someone to back you up, someone who will support you and push you to go further. Someone who drags you out even if you don’t feel up to it. In that spirit, a dog is by far the best workout partner you can ever have. People who have dogs are more motivated to walk. Dogs are better partners than other people, because they will always be excited to go out. They’ll push you to it. Unlike other people who might train with you, a dog can’t make excuses and skip a workout. And the dog won’t listen to your excuses either. It will want to go out regardless of how you’re feeling. That’s a level of commitment that’s hard to find anywhere else. Going to the gym can feel like a chore, but when you’re going out with your pup, you find that it doesn’t feel like exercise anymore. Your motivation is right with you, tugging at the leash. It’s been shown that people who walk their dogs, walk more than people who walk for the exercise alone. The end result of this activity is pretty extraordinary. Pet owners who regularly walk their dogs are 42% more likely to maintain a healthy weight than those who don’t. Three 20 minute walks will give you an hour’s worth of activity during the day. Research has found that people who walk their dogs get more exercise than with a gym membership. On average, pet owners exercise their animals two times for about 24 minutes. Each week, they get five hours and 38 minutes of physical activity. People without dogs average only an hour and 20 minutes of exercise per week. That’s a significant difference. Dogs have had human companions for generations. They’ve helped us survive the most difficult times. Now, they can help us by training us too. We can learn from them how to find the energy and the right motivation to get active. They will change our brains and reform our habits. A doggy workout partner will keep you faithful in your routine, so you can both be happy and...

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Walking Overview – A Step in the right direction

Posted by on Apr 20, 2013 in Walking | 0 comments

Walking Overview – A Step in the right direction

When you’ve been in the health and fitness industry as long as we have, you get asked a lot of different questions. You also get asked a lot of the same questions over and over. But the single most common question endures year after year. That question, ladies and gentlemen, is simply this: “What’s the best exercise?” Despite the simplicity of the question, if you posed it to ten different “fitness professionals,” it’s unlikely even two of them would be in agreement. Chances are you would hear things like “Squats!,” “Dead-lifts,” “Bench Press,” or even some broader terms like “Interval Training,” “High Intensity Training,” or even “Escalating Density Training”. Those who like to keep up with the latest research trends may trumpet the benefits of “Functional Fitness.” There is absolutely nothing wrong with any of these exercises. But the best exercise will always be the one most appropriate to meet your personal training goals. Here, at the BrainChanging Institute, our goal is a bit different. We are interested in helping people “train for life.” So, today, we want to tell you about a different type of exercise that is specifically directed to helping you achieve lifelong health and vitality. It’s more of an activity than an exercise but it’s still the answer that we give when asked that all elusive question – “What is the best exercise?.” And that answer is – Walking.   “WALKING!!?” Yes, walking. “How on earth can walking be the best exercise?,” you would say. Well, we’re glad you asked!   First of all, walking is what makes us human. The real branch in the evolutionary tree that separates man from the other great apes is our ability to easily and efficiently travel long distances walking upright. In order to do this, many changes had to occur in our skeleton and muscles — changes that took millions of years. Once we began walking upright, our hands were free to carry and create. Only after we began walking did we start to grow the massive brain that characterizes modern man. Our evolutionary heritage is repeated in the individual. Our first year of life is defined by the relentless quest to get up, get moving, and finally get walking. The talent and the drive are inborn — you don’t need to teach a child to walk; in fact, short of restraining them, you cannot prevent it. Since walking isn’t a marketable product or service — it doesn’t get the publicity it deserves. Scientific research confirms that the walking habit provides an enormous variety of health benefits. It will improve your thinking now and keep your mind clearer as you age. If you care more about sense than science, be reassured that daily walking is a common feature among cultures that enjoy very long healthy lives. Walking relieves stress and releases “feel good” chemicals into your brain. Now that’s what we call a healthy addiction! Once you learn how to walk, it’s something that you never forget, and it’s something that you can always do, no matter what your level of “ability” is. Because you don’t really need anything to go for a walk, it’s a fantastic way to regain your love of movement. And it can be done anywhere, anytime, which makes it very convenient. You don’t need fancy equipment or a gym membership. You can reap...

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