Testimonials

Wags and brags from our community.

More testimonials 2

Posted by on Apr 23, 2013 in Testimonials | 0 comments

More testimonials 2

Mimi Pollow My favorite walking companion for the last eleven years has been my dog Silas. He is a peke-a-poo. His first volksmarch was at the Northern Virginia Volksmarchers event in early May 1996. He was only three months old and was carried for half the walk. This was also the first walk he ever worked at. I was working at a checkpoint. Silas was sleeping on the chair next to me. Every time someone came up, I would stand up to stamp their start card (a personal idiosyncrasy) and Silas would do so too. He was only three months old, had just done a 5 KM walk, and needed his sleep. I began holding him in my arms on his back, just like a baby, so he could sleep while I worked the checkpoint. He slept through our whole shift. Kevin Shaw At the Piedmont Pacers walk, at the Linganore Winery near Mt Airy MD about a year ago, Peaches did her famous 1/2 hour swim in this pond near the finish (It was quite a hot day, and I wanted the pooches to cool off). However, Peaches cooled off fast, then decided all the ducks and geese would be a lot of fun to swim after. Peaches covered every square foot of that pond, chasing the waterfowl. But she would get close, and they would just fly away! This female walker worried about Peaches, and shamed me into trying to swim after her. She was going to do it if I didn’t! She thought I couldn’t swim. Just as I was about to enter the water, Peaches calmly swam over to shore near me. So I grabbed her and brought her to shore. My friend Marty had tried to find a boat at the start point, but to no avail. Peaches at times was breathing quite hard, and sounded like one of the waterfowl she was chasing, honking away! She also would honk hard when she would get so close to the birds, and they would fly away, and Peaches would get so exasperated! I believe I posted about this walk on the walklist and may be in your archives somewhere. Lucy Krupp My husband’s Maltese (a male named “Angel” who believes himself a Doberman) will follow my husband Marv anywhere. He has been on about 8 10k volksmarches. The only way this is possible is for me to hold his leash and walk several yards behind Marv. As long as Marv moves, the dog moves. We always carry a water dish. The very first walk he did was a city walk with the Mid-Florida Milers. It was all concrete, and Angel didn’t seem to tire, but when we got home, he was too stiff to walk up two steps into the house. He slept almost nonstop for two days. We don’t take him on city walks anymore. The best walk for him was in Helen, Ga. It was all soft pine needles. Marilyn McCarthy My dog is a black dog and the sun really bothers him. I tried to make a cover for him out of a t-shirt, but it didn’t work. He is resourceful in looking for shade when we are doing walks. Several people in our volksmarch club remember times when he would always be heading for shade on walks. I ended up carrying him several times on a walk in Page/Strawberry AZ because it was hot and hilly and he did want to budge. Most of the time he is a real trooper and has been a great companion, since most of the...

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More testimonials 1

Posted by on Apr 23, 2013 in Testimonials | 0 comments

More testimonials 1

Dennis Overcash I have walked with two of our dogs. Our English Cocker named Pooch had always walked really well with us – pulling us everywhere along the trail even in the right direction occasionally. We took him to the Global event at Keesler AFB in 1994. As we rounded the last corner and within sight of the start point, he had had enough. He sat down in the shade of a wall and refused to move. There we sat with the dog for what seemed to be an eternity, probably about 20 minutes with the finish only a few hundred yards ahead. An English Cocker by the way weighs in at around 40 pounds and what he wants to do he does. Our little Beagle mix called Droopy is a good walker, however he has one walking habit that he does faithfully. He passes all fields and unimproved areas with little notice. Just entering civilization again he’ll then find a nice manicured lawn and have his bowel movement. It is never in the places that would make no difference. He waits until the most inconvenient times. We don’t usually plan very well for this, but after leaving the start point we generally are able to find enough trash (paper cups etc. on the sidewalks etc to pick up after him). Cynthia Abrahamson I have a 5-year-old Springer Spaniel-Border Collie mix who loves to volksmarch or do any other human activity. She has been volksmarching her entire life throughout the Northwest, primarily Washington, and has done over 200 volksmarches. I would hate to see her weight if she didn’t walk. We typically do 1 v.m. every weekend with occasional multi-event weekends. She has been to the Portland convention, British Columbia, Oregon coast, and even participated in the Vancouver IML 10 km. When you ask her if she wants to do a volksmarch, she wags her tail and gets into the truck hours before we actually depart. She is as addicted to the walks as her owners. Patti Erickson We were walking up on the Billy Goat Trail off the C&O Canal Towpath in the D.C. area in Maryland. It was a bright, sunny winter’s day and there was no one within hearing. I decided to let her off lead to run around as she so loves to do. (This is not recommended and almost all parks require dogs to be on a leash at all times.) So, she was running around exuberantly, up and down the hollows of the hills rising up from the banks of the Potomac River, which had ice on it out to about 10 yards from shore. She saw a bird out on the ice and took a flying leap onto what appeared to her to be solid ground. But the poor thing plopped right through the leaves and twigs which were disguising the small area of melted ice, into the frigid Potomac water! She was off lead, so I couldn’t assist her. Luckily, she got a foothold on the mud and bounded back up the hill to me with the most pathetic, surprised, wet-doggy look! I felt like an idiot, which I was! The moral of the story is: Think! And obey the leash rules, even when there’s nobody around that the dog might bother! Carol Koch I have a spouse who is not particularly interested in walking; and while I have a few friends who enjoy it, getting together or walking at the same pace seems to be a problem. Sam is always willing to go, matches my pace, loves it, and is...

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Lynn and Adele

Posted by on Apr 23, 2013 in Testimonials | 0 comments

Lynn and Adele

This is Adele… She had all kinds of trouble with breathing. Because she is so small I thought she got plenty of exercise running around in the house and backyard. When I heard about Weight Waggers, I started thinking about how much we think about exercise and not so much about regular movement. I started Adele on a regular walking program and I also made some changes in her diet based on the Weight waggers suggestions. I really did these things to help Adele but her improvement was so dramatic, she really started thriving. I then realized how much the walks were helping me too. I spend a lot of time at my desk and I try to get my exercise in at the gym. But sometimes weeks go by and I just can’t seem to find the time to squeeze it in. Now that Adele and I have a dedicated walking time I’ve really changed my habits. What used to be a chose or a task on my to-do list is now something I really look forward too.. If nothing else, it is the only time I separate myself from my cell phone. I made the picture to give a thumbs up for Weight Waggers… it really is dogs and people getting healthy...

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Leigh

Posted by on Apr 23, 2013 in Testimonials | 0 comments

Leigh

diMy wonderful husband turned the big 50 in September 2011. On a recent visit to his doctor, he was diagnosed with high cholesterol, diabetes, and told to lose weight. They referred him to a dietician who asked if he knew what a low fat diet was. He was told that he needed to lose at least fifty pounds. For a man like him, who has always been physically active and thin most of his life, this came as a shock! He knew that he had a little belly but had no idea how his health had escalated out of control by eating high calorie snacks and fast foods. Reaching middle age and fearing heart disease he knew that he had to make some drastic changes to get his health back in check. He tried different diet programs but found most of them to be too restrictive. A friend of ours suggested walking our dogs every day for at least 45 minutes. Last year, one of our dogs had to have double ACL surgery done in both of her back legs. It was very expensive and her recovery has been a long, slow process. He decided to take her and our overweight redbone coonhound Weight Wagging. It was one of the best decisions he’s ever made! Since he started Weight Wagging, he has lost thirty pounds and our redbone has lost five pounds! My husband no longer needs medicine for diabetes and his cholesterol levels have come down so much that he went off Simvastatin. Thanks to his Weight Wagging routine, our family is much healthier and happier! Blessings,...

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Janna and Fox

Posted by on Apr 23, 2013 in Testimonials | 0 comments

Janna and Fox

I became a regular dog walker almost three years ago, after adopting Fox and Charlie, our two beautiful foxhounds. They were shelter dogs, each with a unique set of quirks and challenges. Initially, I viewed dog walking as another daily responsibility, something to keep my dogs healthy and psychologically balanced. As a full-time personal trainer, people assume that I’m constantly moving – but a lot of my job actually involves standing in one spot, watching someone else exercise. I figured, “I’ll get a little more exercise myself, and the dogs will get what they need.” In a short period of time, these walks came to mean so much more to me. Our walks are a time of meditation for me. They are not the equivalent of walking by myself. Somehow, the presence and energy of these animals serves as a point of connection – to the wind and to the ground beneath my feet — to my senses in general. It connects me with the natural world through my dogs’ extrasensory awareness of it, and their inability to do anything but live exactly in the present moment. I feel their movement through the leashes and innately respond to it, and it often seems that we find some kind of inexplicable symmetry. I gain measurable relief from my stress in this time spent moving and being with my dogs, and this benefit carries over to my clients. I tell people that they can’t release their extra weight – in order to use it – until they address their stress. Walking my dogs gives so much more than the calorie burn of walking – it gives me experiences and benefits that nothing else can quite...

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